Sick Day Saviour

“I decided to tackle this challenge in the form of a personal log completed by Commander Shepherd following the spread of a virus aboard the Normandy and the conflict felt by the hero of the Mass Effect saga as his love and paramor Ashley Williams is inflicted to find a cure and save the day. I’ll concede there was a temptation to draw on some of the beats or emotions expressed during the sequence of events where Ashley was injured in the third game however I wanted to attempt something original and so created a fictional virus spread aboard the ship drawing parallels to some of the fervent nationalism in politics and the division between the human and alien species in this fictional universe. I look forward to checking out my competitors entry and if this my only participation in this event it was fun to flex my fictional writing skills.” Continue reading Sick Day Saviour

12 Months, 12 Games: July – Beyond: Two Souls

“This was my first experience with a title from Quantic Dream, having transitioned from the green team over the generational divide I’ll readily admit to being aware of the attitude and viewpoints towards these games on their original release but with no means to experience these titles being content to view them with a wistful fancy. Having made the transition, with these titles no longer in the cultural zeitgeist to the same extent as system exclusives such as Uncharted or The Last of Us it was only when compiling my list of games to accomplish and clear this year that Beyond came up as one of the contenders for my attention.” Continue reading 12 Months, 12 Games: July – Beyond: Two Souls

A Year of Blogging

“In contrast to the tribal almost hostile attitude found on other social media platforms and services, to date no one has been confrontational or challenging, I’ve yet to experience any hostility or negativity to the extent I’ve seen on other channels. It gives optimism civil discourse can return to some degree when people from different backgrounds come together and share and shape their opinions and viewpoints. As the industry matures and begins to tackle and confront many outstanding social issues permeating around society, I can only hope the respectable exchange of knowledge and opinion continues unabated.” Continue reading A Year of Blogging

Sunshine Blogger Award

“I’ve tackled a few of these in the last six months, most recently around gaming when I tackled the Gamer Tag with a list of questions designed to reveal a little more about yourself from A Geek Girls Guide. This set of questions covers an intriguing range of topics and subjects I’ve discussed in some detail over the months and ones that I always enjoy writing about and challenging myself to answer from gaming music and art to more moralistic decisions. So without further delay, let’s get down to business and answer these questions as set by Kelly.” Continue reading Sunshine Blogger Award

Watchdogs: 5th Anniversary Retrospective

“Released in May 2014 from Ubisoft’s Montreal Studio, a game’s house that has become synonymous with games of this genre and style, assisting, perhaps even instrumental in the formation of some notable and expansive open world franchises including the Assassin’s Creed series and the Far Cry games following the first title from Crytek, Watch Dogs was an original Intellectual Property, IP, that attempted to shift the studios traditional focus from historic or environmental open world titles and establish a new series of games in a modern urban location. ” Continue reading Watchdogs: 5th Anniversary Retrospective

The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition – Book Review

“From Dark Horse Comics and Bioware, the accompanying book to the title, The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition is a rich and thorough collection of art and developmental work released to allow the user and gaming enthusiasts in general a look inside the world of Thedas and the journey of the Inquisitor from survivor to leader and the many challenges and threats faced along the way. We’ve long championed the worlds and lore of the Dragon Age and Mass Effect franchise from Bioware, indeed going further back to the Forgotten Realms titles Baldur’s Gate and Icewind Dale and the various releases and iterations available ever since” Continue reading The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition – Book Review

Video Game Literary Classics: The Legend of Zelda – Ocarina of Time

“Equally, beyond the narrative structure, a great deal of praise is quite rightfully directed towards this game for the portrayal of the human condition, a somewhat vague notion but one in this context that relates to the various stages of the human existence in terms of growth, mortality, emotionality and conflict amongst others. From the opening moments of the game you find yourself as a child, protected by the confines and restrictions of the forest, who through circumstance and legend finds himself on a journey beyond the confines of anything he has known, to the world out there and the many dangers and challenges that present themselves.” Continue reading Video Game Literary Classics: The Legend of Zelda – Ocarina of Time

12 Months, 12 Games: May – Sleeping Dogs

“Having enjoyed its predecessor True Crime¬† on the Gamecube a generation prior, for a Nintendo devotee my one true immersion into the open world action adventure titles missing out on the grandeur of the Grand Theft Auto series, I was intrigued about the possibility of following up both its style and gameplay with the added resources and power of the seventh generation of hardware.” Continue reading 12 Months, 12 Games: May – Sleeping Dogs

Biohazard 4 Soundtrack Book Review

“The Soundtrack Book released in Japan as an accompanying piece of merchandise to the game was a surprising find, admittedly a somewhat mystery package in a store selling a wide variety of gaming memorabilia but one given its name was recognisable and the curiosity towards a Soundtrack Songbook was a strong one. ” Continue reading Biohazard 4 Soundtrack Book Review

Financial Incentive and Reward in Video Games: Part Two – Disposable Income

“Money and finance was in its infancy in Western gaming culture, a rudimentary approximation of capitalism with the notion of earned income and market economies competing for your wealth, but no market forces driving creative destruction or associatory evolution, in contrast in the East, Korea was evolving its approach to technology and finance, an impact that wouldn’t be felt for over a decade in our supposedly advanced and developed society.” Continue reading Financial Incentive and Reward in Video Games: Part Two – Disposable Income