30 Day Challenge Day Five: What is the geekiest thing you’ve ever done?

“It’s probably the most geeky action I’ve undertaken where I’ve taken the base product, in this case Assassin’s Creed Syndicate and invested significant time and effort to produce content with no measurable benefit to anyone else really besides myself that I know of. ” Continue reading 30 Day Challenge Day Five: What is the geekiest thing you’ve ever done?

Manga Exhibit,The British Museum

“As an art form that pertains to originate from the 12th century, and whose prominence and cultural impact grew with a cultural expansion in the 18th century, whilst in the UK we perhaps incorrectly view Manga as an art form through the prism of its expansion into western culture around the time traditional comic book art developed following the post war era, as a practise its origins can be traced over hundreds of years, fitting then to attend an exhibition at the British Museum and explore the origins and expansion of this creative approach into the mainstream zeitgeist.” Continue reading Manga Exhibit,The British Museum

London Film and Comic Con 2019

“This show was definitely more centred around the guests and actors they had attracted from a variety of genres and shows. It fulfilled my intention of meeting a number of Star Trek stars this year in addition to attending and enjoying the various panels, an added bonus.” Continue reading London Film and Comic Con 2019

The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition – Book Review

“From Dark Horse Comics and Bioware, the accompanying book to the title, The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition is a rich and thorough collection of art and developmental work released to allow the user and gaming enthusiasts in general a look inside the world of Thedas and the journey of the Inquisitor from survivor to leader and the many challenges and threats faced along the way. We’ve long championed the worlds and lore of the Dragon Age and Mass Effect franchise from Bioware, indeed going further back to the Forgotten Realms titles Baldur’s Gate and Icewind Dale and the various releases and iterations available ever since” Continue reading The Art of Dragon Age Inquisition – Book Review

Comic Con London 2019: My First Convention

“What made the experience tolerable if not enjoyable was the strange sensation of queuing with a variety of characters in my immediate vicinity from Avengers to Indiana Jones, wrestlers, game heroes, those in spandex, those in fun t shirts, all sexualities, creeds and colours, everyone representing the best aspects of themselves and yet conforming to the English tradition of orderly queues.” Continue reading Comic Con London 2019: My First Convention

Biohazard 4 Soundtrack Book Review

“The Soundtrack Book released in Japan as an accompanying piece of merchandise to the game was a surprising find, admittedly a somewhat mystery package in a store selling a wide variety of gaming memorabilia but one given its name was recognisable and the curiosity towards a Soundtrack Songbook was a strong one. ” Continue reading Biohazard 4 Soundtrack Book Review

Weaponry of Resident Evil

“Barry Burton, Resident Evil

One of the fundamental aspects of the Resident Evil series has been its reliance and portrayal of weaponry, principally guns over the course of its history. As a structural mechanic, their inclusion and prevalence has worked to both serve as a defensive measure against the hordes of the undead but in equal measure has fundamentally shifted the narrative tone from that of survival to onslaught especially in the seventh generation titles with the release of Resident Evil 4 and 5. My experience of both these titles in my first play through a taught and menacing experience but as you came to unlock and upgrade your weapons the experience changed, gone the fear and dread of facing the larger monsters and demons, now replaced with a cavalier and brazen attitude of defiance and might.” Continue reading Weaponry of Resident Evil

Star Trek: New Worlds, New Civilizations – Book Review

“Allow me if you will, to indulge another of my personal interests and introduce a long forgotten Art Book that has stood idly on my shelf for the best part of a decade but in my humble opinion exemplifies the best artistic aspects and practises we have been championing for the past half year in the gaming community and highlight this incredible visionary take on the worlds and societies of Star Trek. From publisher Simon and Schuster and acclaimed author Michael Jan Friedman whose credits include multiple Star Trek novels and material, this is one the most unique and fascinating reference books on the worlds and civilizations of the Star Trek universe, ostensibly told from the perspective of a visitor to these distant shores, the 288 pages span the entire franchise of locations visited up until that point from the pilot episode of the Cage to the latest motion picture in 1999, Insurrection.” Continue reading Star Trek: New Worlds, New Civilizations – Book Review

The Tower of London during the Great War

“This inspired me to go back and visit this subject I have talked about in-depth one last time to compare and contrast the digital and electronic versions of the same event and period, a comparison I hadn’t look to explore previously when attempting to frame identical shots and images from the historical to the contemporary worlds due to the lack of real world historical photos.” Continue reading The Tower of London during the Great War

12 Months, 12 Games: February – Firewatch

“For me, the lasting impression I took of the game playing as Henry was a broken and hurt individual who had sacrificed a great deal for the woman he loves, perhaps loved. The Forest presented a chance to heal and find peace in his soul and in the choices he had made.” Continue reading 12 Months, 12 Games: February – Firewatch